•  
  •  
 

Abstract

As consumers are embracing emerging electric vehicles (EVs) as an important step to take in combating climate change, the reality is that the EV solution has some serious short-term issues to address, especially when evaluating the lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) that power most EVs. This comment first discusses the potential problems associated with the lack of recycling and disposal technology as well as regulations that are available for EV LIBs. Even though consumers and regulators alike are supportive that fossil fuel-burning internal combustion engines need to be replaced with cleaner transportation options such as EVs, policies, and proclamations are still subject to the intricacies and timelines of evolving technology. That means that until EV technology becomes routine, recycling practices and associated legislation are subject to too much fluctuation to create concrete standards. So, what does society do with the EV LIBs between now and that future time? One answer this comment provides is that sustainability-committed municipalities could promote valuable second-life reuse options for EV LIBs. Furthermore, this comment suggests Orlando, Florida, is an excellent example of a pioneer city to exhibit how to incorporate spent EV LIBs within their self-governing powers and in conjunction with the technological partnerships they have cultivated with industry and academia. By linking the city’s commitments to sustainability, renewable energy, and innovation, Orlando has an opportunity to show other cities in Florida and across the U.S. how local self- governed municipalities can solve newly evolving issues associated with these advancing technologies in the void of federal and state legislation, regulations and mandates.

Share

COinS